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Fixing sandbar rash


General disarray

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Wanted some quick input. 

The lower leading edge of my bow is starting to show some resin. Since the gel around it is perfectly smooth to the exposed resin my plan is to tape out an area 2 - 3" wider than the exposed resin, fill that will gel coat, then taper the edges.

 

Is that the best way to fix this? We are only talking 2 .5-1" sections about 1/4" wide

 

 

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10 minutes ago, General disarray said:

Wanted some quick input. 

The lower leading edge of my bow is starting to show some resin. Since the gel around it is perfectly smooth to the exposed resin my plan is to tape out an area 2 - 3" wider than the exposed resin, fill that will gel coat, then taper the edges.

 

Is that the best way to fix this? We are only talking 2 .5-1" sections about 1/4" wide

 

 

That will work until it wears through and it's time to do it again. I've fixed mine a lot of times and never put too much time into, it's just maintenance.

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20 minutes ago, BradM said:

That will work until it wears through and it's time to do it again. I've fixed mine a lot of times and never put too much time into, it's just maintenance.

Got it - definitely makes me feel better that this wasn't from abuse. 

 

Ive done it once but layered just enough to cover the actual spot

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 5/22/2019 at 3:52 PM, General disarray said:

Is that the best way to fix this?

Well, the best way to PREVENT this is to not run the bow up on the beach.  E.g.....

Miss_Laurie-11.thumb.jpg.d3b157b4ecd06fd9620988a0f5e6da6a.jpg

That is my 2009 20 footer with over 1000 hours on her.

Running up on the beach is the equivalent of sanding the bow with course sandpaper and although it looks clear, if there is just one rock or shell anywhere on the beach, she will almost always hit it.  Murphy's Law, I guess.

Here on the Georgia Coast ( as fishmanjj well knows ) the current runs parallel to the beach at a good clip.  Drop the big anchor off the bow in 10 feet of water with 150 feet of rode.  Once dug in, back down toward the beach and when the depth reads 3 feet, toss the small anchor up on the beach.  Shut down and tilt the engine, hop out in the shallow water and secure the anchor on the beach.  The boat will now be back in deep water because of the current.  Leave the small anchor dug in on the beach and manually pull the boat in to the shallow water so the rest of the family can hop off without getting too wet.  Once everyone is out of the boat, with the end of the small anchor line cleated, let her swing out away from the sandbar into the 10 feet of water.  Takes less time to execute than to read.

Here is what the keel of the 22 TRS looks like with 400 hours...

42711182_LowResMissLaurieIV-1.thumb.jpg.e2d025ae2b7f0d1a3d585de1a4b6a412.jpg

What looks like a black scuff mark is actually the reflection of the road bed

273644924_LowResMissLaurieIV-3.thumb.jpg.88f3213fb666bb073c7c8336473ef7af.jpg

Low ResMiss Laurie IV-6.jpg

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1 hour ago, Ron in Atlanta said:

Well, the best way to PREVENT this is to not run the bow up on the beach.  E.g.....

Miss_Laurie-11.thumb.jpg.d3b157b4ecd06fd9620988a0f5e6da6a.jpg

That is my 2009 20 footer with over 1000 hours on her.

Running up on the beach is the equivalent of sanding the bow with course sandpaper and although it looks clear, if there is just one rock or shell anywhere on the beach, she will almost always hit it.  Murphy's Law, I guess.

Here on the Georgia Coast ( as fishmanjj well knows ) the current runs parallel to the beach at a good clip.  Drop the big anchor off the bow in 10 feet of water with 150 feet of rode.  Once dug in, back down toward the beach and when the depth reads 3 feet, toss the small anchor up on the beach.  Shut down and tilt the engine, hop out in the shallow water and secure the anchor on the beach.  The boat will now be back in deep water because of the current.  Leave the small anchor dug in on the beach and manually pull the boat in to the shallow water so the rest of the family can hop off without getting too wet.  Once everyone is out of the boat, with the end of the small anchor line cleated, let her swing out away from the sandbar into the 10 feet of water.  Takes less time to execute than to read.

Here is what the keel of the 22 TRS looks like with 400 hours...

42711182_LowResMissLaurieIV-1.thumb.jpg.e2d025ae2b7f0d1a3d585de1a4b6a412.jpg

What looks like a black scuff mark is actually the reflection of the road bed

273644924_LowResMissLaurieIV-3.thumb.jpg.88f3213fb666bb073c7c8336473ef7af.jpg

Low ResMiss Laurie IV-6.jpg

You should consider washing your boats once in a while. They are absolutely filthy! And I thought I was over the top with how anal I am. You sir have just raised the bar for me. 

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D linesider ,   Ron is the king of Zaino, a helluva photographer and a very dear friend.  Nobody and I mean nobody keeps a boat as clean as his....or his cars and trucks. I mean, just look at the trailer also....have you ever seen a trailer that clean unless it was brand new ?  His boat has over 300 coats of Zaino wax on it.  👍😎🎣

 

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On 6/14/2019 at 8:24 PM, D-linesider said:

You should consider washing your boats once in a while. They are absolutely filthy! And I thought I was over the top with how anal I am. You sir have just raised the bar for me. 

Sorry to derail but Ron, can you give us a few of your trailer tips? Sharkhide before the trailers  first dunk? Salt away after every launch/retrieval ? My hat is off to you sir, spectacular!

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22 hours ago, beachbuggy said:

Sorry to derail but Ron, can you give us a few of your trailer tips? Sharkhide before the trailers  first dunk? Salt away after every launch/retrieval ? My hat is off to you sir, spectacular!

Thank you.  I do try to keep the boat looking good since it is such a beautiful boat right from the factory.  

The trailer is of course super important if you live in Atlanta as I do - the nearest interesting water is a long tow from here.  Most likely, the reason the trailer looks good is that 60% of the launches are into FRESH WATER.  As mentioned earlier, minutes after a dunk in salt water, it gets a bath of Saltaway, mostly on the brakes and a good fresh water wash at the end of the day.  Cleaning is just fresh water, a 3M green scrubbing pad (large size) and as you guessed, Sharkhide.  It goes in to Pat Rogers Hitches and Trailer Repair twice a year for bearing check and relubing and brake inspection and repair if needed.

I know many of the folks on the forum do DYI trailer maintenance.  I always let the pros handle that because 1) I'm not an expert on that, and 2) There is nothing sadder than a broken down boat trailer on the side of Route 16 half way between Savannah and Atlanta on a Sunday night.  I do of course carry the spare and all tools needed to change a flat - no amount of maintenance can prevent flat tires and I ALWAYS stop to help any one on the side of the road with a trailer.

Good luck, see you on the water.

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