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Islamorado to flamingoo


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Not being a smart*** and please don't take this wrong but you can also do it with a real navigation chart (Waterproof Chart #33E is the easiest to read) and your comp***, pretty easily in fact. It's good to know how to do it the old school way just in case and it makes you pay more attention to landmarks, channel markers, etc...

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  • 3 years later...
On 1/12/2016 at 12:16 AM, jason p said:

Not being a smart*** and please don't take this wrong but you can also do it with a real navigation chart (Waterproof Chart #33E is the easiest to read) and your comp***, pretty easily in fact. It's good to know how to do it the old school way just in case and it makes you pay more attention to landmarks, channel markers, etc...

  I agree 100%, I only use my electronics if I absolutely need them. I study maps, landscape, environment, etc. In the book "Men of Steel Boats of Wood" they navigated the ENP, before it became a park with just lanterns and a boat full of mullet at night.  

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3 hours ago, Limitless said:

Oh gee . . .  maybe you could do that with a $450 chip in your minimum 9+" screen GPS.

No maybe about it. It's been done countless times perfectly.  And it's easier and far more efficient and safer even on a tiny 5" screen compared to using paper charts or noaa based GPS charts.  And what's even better is you can actually see exactly where the Poll and Troll boundaries are to make sure you run the legal corridors and you won't find that on any paper chart that is detailed enough to actually use to determine an exact run because those charts that do have it are put out by the park service and they are like cartoons.  And the last versions I saw of the Garmin controlled gps charts don't even have the Poll and Troll boundaries at all.  That is a pretty glaring oversight considering all of the flats in the Park are now poll and troll only.  And  you could also run it after sunset if you had to without worrying about that or where the hundreds of directional posts or numerous large signs or other obstacles that are not accurately reflected on the paper charts.  Even a kid could do it and there are some actual testimonials of that by satisfied parents who watched while their kid run the entire 26.5 miles.   And as an added bonus you can actually use it to find pot holes to fish.  That is not going to happen with the paper charts.  People that use it seem to feel its more than worth the cost and they stow their paper charts away as an emergency backup.    There are always a few naysayers when better technology comes out that prefer the old ways.  I know one that still uses a rotary phone.  It works fine and the cord is no issue just like stopping the boat to read a paper map in the wind. 

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I asked this question on another thread. I did get a Top Spot chart recently and there are routes etc. I have never been so I am trying to gain as much knowledge as I can. Of course I know how to navigate and can keep a watchful eye, but pointers are always helpful. Florida Marine Tracks would make this easier, but Im not trying to invest in that for my first trip. Thank you for all the input.

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GPS? I’m not sure if mine works anymore; I’d have to find it first. Paper chart?? Only when I’m trying to decide what spot to fish after I eat lunch. 😁  

Insurance industry data clearly shows that GPS units are the biggest culprit for the increase of small boat groundings & hitting submerged objects in the water all over this beautiful state. Taking your eyes off the water while running, even for a second or two, is the same as looking at your cell phone when driving your car. The results are the same: more accidents.

I’ve taught my son how to drive a boat, not how to read a screen. To each their own but I don’t feel comfortable on a boat with someone who needs to look at a GPS screen in order to navigate. 

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7 minutes ago, conocean said:

GPS? I’m not sure if mine works anymore; I’d have to find it first. Paper chart?? Only when I’m trying to decide what spot to fish after I eat lunch. 😁  

Insurance industry data clearly shows that GPS units are the biggest culprit for the increase of small boat groundings & hitting submerged objects in the water all over this beautiful state. Taking your eyes off the water while running, even for a second or two, is the same as looking at your cell phone when driving your car. The results are the same: more accidents.

I’ve taught my son how to drive a boat, not how to read a screen. To each their own but I don’t feel comfortable on a boat with someone who needs to look at a GPS screen in order to navigate. 

I feel the same when I board an airplane with my family.

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2 hours ago, conocean said:

Insurance industry data clearly shows that GPS units are the biggest culprit for the increase of small boat groundings & hitting submerged objects in the water all over this beautiful state. Taking your eyes off the water while running, even for a second or two, is the same as looking at your cell phone when driving your car. The results are the same: more accidents.

 

That is very telling right there since most everyone is running a navionics or Garmin controlled chart.  If they are looking their boat on the gps screen and still running aground and crashing, that tells you everything you need to know about the accuracy and reliability of those charts.   Maybe they should start charging an insurance premium for running those charts due to the increased risk.   It was the primary reason the ISLA charts were created so that you actually could drive on the GPS and go anywhere without crashing and do it at midnight if you had to. 

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I did the the run with a garmin the first time I stayed in Islamorado.  Used top shot chart and made it to Flamingo no problem but took awhile.  Coming back was easier because I way pointed all the channels.  That being said I wouldn't want to make the run or fish without FMT it's that good. 

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3 hours ago, conocean said:

  

Insurance industry data clearly shows that GPS units are the biggest culprit for the increase of small boat groundings & hitting submerged objects in the water all over this beautiful state. Taking your eyes off the water while running, even for a second or two, is the same as looking at your cell phone when driving your car. The results are the same: more accidents.

 

Now that's some data I'd clearly like to read. Please post. GPS navigation is a navigational aid/tool, I agree, not to be solely relied on however,  with todays technology, constant updates on region chips such as FMT and the like, it's a safe, not for sure, bet that it's more accurate than a paper chart that is not updated nearly as much as the data cards. Go into a body of water that you've never been in before and there is no way you're eyes will guide you where ever you want to go. The eye to water angle does not tell everything.  An overhead view is far better, hence the navigational overhead screen view on a GPS. Try changing your screen view to 3D view and you will quickly see how much less you see ahead of you which is more like the eye to water angle. I actually get an insurance discount for having a unit I can update an SD card on for more accurate navigation. Guides use them ships use them, admittedly, far more advanced than our uses but the concept is the same, safer travels on the water.

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3 hours ago, Sunstone said:

I did the the run with a garmin the first time I stayed in Islamorado.  Used top shot chart and made it to Flamingo no problem but took awhile.  Coming back was easier because I way pointed all the channels.  That being said I wouldn't want to make the run or fish without FMT it's that good. 

I’ve done the same run with a Garmin numerous times and never an issue. 

I keep hearing more & more people rave about FMT so it could only be a matter of time before I get it too🙂

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13 minutes ago, conocean said:

I keep hearing more & more people rave about FMT so it could only be a matter of time before I get it too!

Really ???

 

You are the FMT of Chokoloskee.....I have one on my skiff now (FMT) and I will tell you in days previous, I would not run the Lopez on a low tide...now, I do feel comfortable running the Lopez and other areas of the ENP.  Most importantly, both the Chatham and Houston has some nasty bars on the low, and FMT has taken me through there 3x's without nothing more than a few bumps....previously, with my Garmin, it was read the water, aim, fire through the hole....I still pay attention to the water movements, I'm always looking ahead as the FMT will not point out any sticks in the water that have submerged trees....so, it's more of a guide for me....there are still many areas I run, such as back up in Storter and other areas off the ENP, where there are no FMT tracks, that you must learn on your own, through slow going and spending time in the bights on the lows....

Just remember, to anyone considering an FMT, it's highly dependent upon the winds and tides....what could be passable on one day...is high and dry on another....

I think the biggest benefit to the FMT is for the new ENP boater who does not know the backcountry in a specific area and needs some guidance....for the price of entry, it's minimal compared to a broken lower unit......and tow home :(

Safe boating.....

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Why/how does every navigation thread turn into a sales pitch?  Is it like a timeshare?  If I read and sit through the whole thread do I get a free weekend away at a beach condo?

P.S.  If I was looking at buying, I would be more inclined to do so if the company did not bash everyone and thing that was not using their product.

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We ran that trip frompa pa Joes to flamingo way before we knew what a GPS was . We called twin key pass Barracuda pass and would stop there and play with the cud’s on the way to little rabbit key , hit little rabbit for mangrove snapper , hit a little deeper water between little and big rabbit for trout than run toward man a war that use to be loaded with bigger mangrove snapper , next stop was redfish out front of flamingo . The first few trips we would get turned around looking for a opening in the bank heading towards man a war . It was a lot of fun back than like exploring. 

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